Lurch meaning

lûrch
(obs.) To get by cheating, robbing, tricking, etc.
verb
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To roll or pitch suddenly or erratically.

The ship lurched in the storm. The car gave a start and then lurched forward.

verb
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A staggering or tottering movement or gait.
noun
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An abrupt rolling or pitching.
noun
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To roll, pitch, or sway suddenly forward or to one side.
verb
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To stagger.
verb
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The losing position of a cribbage player who has not passed the halfway mark at the end of the game.
noun
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(obs.) The act of lurching.
noun
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The definition of lurch is to walk or move unsteadily and without stability.

An example of lurch is when you are intoxicated and stumbling around.

verb
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Lurch is defined as leaving someone without help or without something you promised or a sudden movement forward or to one side.

An example of lurch is where you figuratively leave someone when you promise to pick up your friend's kids from school and then call five minutes before the bell and cancel.

An example of lurch is when someone unexpectedly and rapidly falls forward.

noun
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A lurching movement; sudden rolling, pitching, etc.
noun
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(obs.) To remain furtively near a place; lurk.
verb
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(archaic) To prevent (a person) from getting his fair share of something.
verb
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(archaic) A situation in certain card games, in which the winner has more than double the score of the loser.
noun
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The lurch of a ship, or of a drunkard.

noun
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To make such a sudden, unsteady movement.
verb
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(obsolete) To swallow or eat greedily; to devour; hence, to swallow up.
verb
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An old game played with dice and counters; a variety of the game of tables.
noun
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A double score in cribbage for the winner when his/her adversary has been left in the lurch.
noun
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in the lurch
  • In a difficult or embarrassing position.
idiom
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lie at (or on) the lurch
  • to lie in wait
idiom
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leave someone in the lurch
  • to leave someone in a difficult situation; leave someone in trouble and needing help
idiom
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
lurch
Plural:
lurches

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

in the lurch
lie at (<i>or</i> on) the lurch

Origin of lurch

  • Perhaps back-formation from Middle English lurching a total victory at lorche, a kind of game perhaps akin to lurken to lurk lurk

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Origin unknown

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • French lourche (“deceived, embarrassed; also the name of a game").

    From Wiktionary

  • Latin lurcare.

    From Wiktionary