Juggle definitions

jŭg'əl
To toss and catch (two or more objects) so that at least one of them is in the air at all times.
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To have difficulty holding; balance insecurely.

Juggled the ball but finally caught it; shook hands while juggling a cookie and a teacup.

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To keep (more than two activities, for example) in motion or progress at one time.

Managed to juggle a full-time job and homemaking.

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To manipulate in order to deceive.

Juggle figures in a ledger.

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To juggle objects or perform other tricks of manual dexterity.
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To make rapid motions or manipulations.

Juggled with the controls on the television to improve the picture.

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To use trickery; practice deception.
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The act of juggling.
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Trickery for a dishonest end.
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To perform skillful tricks of sleight of hand with (balls, knives, etc.) as by keeping a number of them in the air continuously.
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To make several awkward attempts to catch or hold (a ball, etc.)
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To manage, often resourcefully, (various tasks or responsibilities) at the same time.
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To manipulate or practice trickery on so as to deceive or cheat.

To juggle figures so as to show a profit.

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To toss up a number of balls, knives, etc. and keep them continuously in the air.
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An act of juggling.
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A clever trick or deception.
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To manipulate objects, such as balls, clubs, beanbags, rings, etc. in an artful or artistic manner. Juggling may also include assorted other circus skills such as the diabolo, devil sticks, hat, and cigar box manipulation as well.

She can juggle flaming torches.

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To handle or manage many tasks at once.

He juggled home, school, and work for two years.

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(intransitive) To deceive by trick or artifice.
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(juggling) To throw and catch each prop at least twice, as a opposed to a flash.
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Origin of juggle

Middle English jogelen to entertain by performing tricks from Old French jogler from Latin ioculārī to jest from ioculus diminutive of iocus joke yek- in Indo-European roots