Jpeg meaning

jāpĕg
A digital image that has been compressed using this algorithm.
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A standard algorithm for the compression of digital images, making it easier to store and transmit them.
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A standard algorithm for the compression of digital images.
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Short for Joint Photographic Experts Group.
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A graphics file format for editing still images, as well as color facsimile, desktop publishing, graphic arts, and medical imaging. A symmetrical compression technique, JPEG is equally expensive, processor-intensive, and time consuming in terms of both compression and decompression. JPEG is a joint standard of the International Telecommunications Union (ITU-T T.81) and the International Organization for Standardization (ISO 10918-1). JPEG involves a lossy compression mechanism using discrete cosine transform (DCT). Compression rates of 100:1 can be achieved, although the loss is noticeable at that level. Compression rates of 10:1 or 20:1 yield little degradation in image quality. See also compression, DCT, GIF, ISO, ITU-T, lossy compression, PNG, and symmetric. 96 120 6.312 Mbps 7.786 Mbps.
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Alternative form of JPEG.
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(computing) Acronym of Joint Photographic Experts Group. (It is an image compression standard)
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(computing) An image using the JFIF image file format, containing an image compressed using JPEG compression.
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(computing) An image file in the JFIF format.
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A digital image stored as a file so compressed.

A JPEG of a cat.

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(Joint Photographic Experts Group) An ISO/ITU standard for compressing still images. Pronounced "jay-peg," the JPEG format is very popular due to its variable compression range. JPEGs are saved on a sliding resolution scale based on the quality desired. For example, an image can be saved in high quality for photo printing, in medium quality for the Web and in low quality for attaching to emails, the latter providing the smallest file size for fastest transmission over slow connections.Not Great for TextJPEGs are not suitable for graphs, charts and explanatory illustrations because the text appears fuzzy, especially at low resolutions. Compressing images in the GIF format is much better for such material (see GIF).JPEGs Are LossyUsing discrete cosine transform, JPEG is a lossy compression method, wherein some data from the original image is lost. It depends on the image, but ratios of 10:1 to 20:1 may provide little noticeable loss. The more the loss can be tolerated, the more the image can be compressed.Compression is achieved by dividing the picture into tiny pixel blocks, which are halved over and over until the desired amount of compression is achieved. JPEGs can be created in software or hardware, the latter providing sufficient speed for real-time, on-the-fly compression. C-Cube Microsystems introduced the first JPEG chip. See JPEG2000, JPE file and GIF.File ExtensionsJPEGs use the JPEG File Interchange Format (JFIF), and file extensions are .JPG or .JFF. M-JPEG and MPEG are variations of JPEG used for full-motion digital video (see MPEG). See graphics formats.
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An extension to the JPEG format from Storm Technology, Mountain View, CA, that allowed picture areas to be selectable for different ratios. For example, the background could be compressed higher than the foreground image. Areas containing text could be compressed very little, while the rest of the image could be compressed a lot. Storm Technology closed its doors in 1998. See JPEG.
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Origin of jpeg

  • J(oint) P(hotographic) E(xperts) G(roup)

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Joint Photographic Experts Group, the name of the committee that created the standard.

    From Wiktionary