Jealous meaning

jĕləs
Envious or resentful of the good fortune or achievements of another.

I felt jealous when my coworker got a promotion.

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Fearful or wary of losing one's position or situation to someone else, especially in a sexual relationship.

Her new boyfriend was jealous of her male friends.

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Vigilant in guarding something.

We are jealous of our good name.

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Having to do with or arising from feelings of envy, apprehension, or bitterness.

Jealous thoughts.

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Very watchful or careful in guarding or keeping.

Jealous of one's rights.

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Intolerant of disloyalty or infidelity; autocratic.

A jealous god.

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Envious or resentful of the good fortune or achievements of another.

I felt jealous when my coworker got a promotion.

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Suspecting rivalry in love; troubled by worries that one might have been replaced in someone's affections; suspicious of a lover or spouse's fidelity. [from 13th c.]
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Protective, zealously guarding, careful in the protection of something one has or appreciates. [from 14th c.]

For you must not worship any other god, for the Lord, whose name is Jealous, is a jealous God. —Exodus 34:14 (NET)

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Envious; feeling resentful of someone for a perceived advantage, material or otherwise. [from 14th c.]
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(archaic) Requiring exclusive loyalty.

“for I the Lord your God am a jealous God”

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Having to do with or arising from feelings of apprehension, bitterness, or envy.

Jealous thoughts.

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Fearful or wary of losing one's position or situation to someone else, especially in a sexual relationship.
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The definition of jealous is disliking when someone wants something you have.

An example of jealous is a husband who dislikes other men looking at his wife.

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The definition of jealous is guarding something that is yours.

An example of jealous is having asked your boss to not call you at home after work.

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Origin of jealous

  • Middle English jelous from Old French gelos jealous, zealous from Vulgar Latin zēlōsus from Late Latin zēlus zeal zeal

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • [1382] From Old French jalous, from Late Latin zelosus, from Ancient Greek ζῆλος (zēlos, “zeal, jealousy”), from ζηλόω (zēloō, “to emulate, to be jealous”). Cognate to zeal.

    From Wiktionary