Guaranty meaning

gărən-tē
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A promise to be answerable for the debt or obligation of another in the event of nonpayment or nonperformance.
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A guarantee serving to assure a particular outcome or condition.
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A guarantor.
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To provide a guaranty for.
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To guarantee.
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A pledge committing a person to the payment of another's debt or the fulfillment of another's obligation in the event of default.
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An agreement that secures the existence or maintenance of something.
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Something given or held as security.
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A guarantor.
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A contract whereby one person or corporation becomes liable to perform a specific act or duty for another person or corporation if that person or corporation doesn’t fulfill a responsibility. The responsibility usually is financial. For example, a corporation may guarantee that its subsidiary will fulfill the terms of a contract that the subsidiary signs with one of its customers.
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(law) An undertaking to answer for the payment of some debt, or the performance of some contract or duty, of another, in case of the failure of such other to pay or perform; a warranty; a security.
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Something serving as a security for such an undertaking.
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Obsolete spelling of guarantee.
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The definition of a guaranty is a promise or written agreement to do something.

An example of a guaranty is a written statement by an electronics store that they have the best price available on a television; a price guaranty.

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Origin of guaranty

  • Anglo-Norman guarantie from Old French from garant, guarant warrant of Germanic origin wer-4 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Anglo-Norman guarantie, from Old French guarantie (“protection, defense”), from Old French garantir, guarantir (“to warrant, vouch for something”), from Old French garant, guarant, warant (“a warrant; warranter, supporter, defender, protector”), from Frankish *warand, *warjand (“a warrant”), from Frankish *warjan (“to fend for, designate something as true, vouch for”), from Proto-Germanic *warjaną (“to defend, protect”), from Proto-Indo-European *wer- (“to close, cover, protect, save, defend”). Cognate with Middle Low German warent, warend (“a warrant”), German gewähren (“to grant”). More at warrant. Compare guarantee, warranty.

    From Wiktionary