Gram meaning

grăm
A metric unit of mass equal to one thousandth (10−3 ) of a kilogram.
noun
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A grandmother.
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Any of certain leguminous plants, used as fodder; esp., the chickpea.
noun
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A telegram or singing telegram, or something resembling this in some way.

Mailgram, Candygram.

affix
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Any of several legumes, such as the chickpea, bearing seeds used as food.
noun
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The basic unit of mass in the metric system, equal to 0.03527 ounce (0.0022046 pound or 15.4321 grains): now defined in the SI system as 0.001 of the mass of the standard international kilogram (a platinum-iridium cylinder kept in France): one pound equals 453.5924 grams.
noun
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A unit of mass in the metric system, equal to 0.001 kilogram or 0.035 ounce.
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A unit of mass equal to one-thousandth of a kilogram. Symbol: g.
noun
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A group of leguminous plants that are grown for their seeds. pulses.
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abbreviation
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noun
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Grammar.
abbreviation
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Grammatical.
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Something written down, drawn, or recorded.

Telegram, electrocardiogram.

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(uncountable) The seeds of these plants.
noun
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noun
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(obsolete) Angry.

adjective
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A surname​.
pronoun
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A town in Denmark.
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Gram is defined as a nickname for a grandmother.

An example of gram is your mom’s mom.

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The seeds of such a plant.
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Something written or drawn; a record.

Cardiogram.

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A gram is a unit of measure in the metric system that equals one thousandth of a kilogram.

An example of a gram is .035 ounces or four pinches of salt.

noun
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Origin of gram

  • < Gr gramma: see gram
    From Webster's New World College Dictionary, 5th Edition
  • French gramme from Late Latin gramma a small weight from Greek something written, small weight gerbh- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Obsolete Portuguese from Latin grānum seed gr̥ə-no- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Greek -gramma from gramma letter gerbh- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Shortening and alteration of gramma or grandmother
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From French gramme, from Ancient Greek γραμμάριον (grammárion, “weight of two obols”), from γραμμή (grammḗ, “line”).
    From Wiktionary
  • From Portuguese grão. From Latin grānum.
    From Wiktionary
  • Old English, akin to grim.
    From Wiktionary
  • Diminutive of grandmother
    From Wiktionary