Graith meaning

(now chiefly UK dialectal) Ready; prepared.
adjective
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(now chiefly UK dialectal) Straight; direct; prompt.
adjective
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(now chiefly UK dialectal) Free; clear; available.
adjective
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(now chiefly UK dialectal) To make ready; prepare; put in order; make fit for use.
verb
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(now chiefly UK dialectal) To deal with; treat; handle (a person); complement.
verb
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(intransitive, now chiefly UK dialectal) To dress; get dressed.
verb
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(now chiefly UK dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) An apparatus of any kind; gadget; materials or equipment; tackle; tools or implements.
noun
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(now chiefly UK dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) Furnishings; furniture; equipment or accoutrements for work, travelling, war, etc.

noun
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Origin of graith

  • From Middle English graith, grayth, greith, from Old Norse greiðr (“ready, available, free”), from Proto-Germanic *garaidijaz (“ready, orderly”), from Proto-Germanic *ga- + Proto-Indo-European *rēydʰ- (“to count, order”). Cognate with Old English ġerǣde (“ready, prompt”), German gerade (“straight, direct”), Gothic (garaids, “exact”). More at ready.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English graith, graythe, greithe, from Old Norse greiði (“preparation, arrangement”), from Proto-Germanic *garaidiją (“apparatus, gadget”). Cognate with Icelandic greiðe, greiði (“preparation, arrangement, order, hospitality”), Faroese greiði (“requisite articles”), Norwegian greida (“implements, tackle”), Norwegian greide (“harness”).

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English graithen, greithen, graiden, grathen, from Old Norse greiða (“to make ready, prepare, arrange, disentangle”), from Proto-Germanic *garaidijaną (“to prepare, put in order”). Cognate with Old English ġerǣdan (“to arrange, dispose, order, provide for, harness”), Gothic (garaidjan, “to enjoin”).

    From Wiktionary