Golf meaning

gŏlf, gôlf
A game played on a large outdoor course with a series of 9 or 18 holes spaced far apart, the object being to propel a small, hard ball with the use of various clubs into each hole with as few strokes as possible.
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A game played on a large outdoor course with a series of 9 or 18 holes spaced far apart, the object being to propel a small, hard ball with the use of various clubs into each hole with as few strokes as possible.
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To play this game.

She golfed every day on her vacation.

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To play this game at (a location).

He golfed 18 holes this morning. I golfed the municipal course last Saturday.

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To play this game.

She golfed every day on her vacation.

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To play this game at (a location).

He golfed 18 holes this morning. I golfed the municipal course last Saturday.

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An outdoor game played on a large course with a small, hard ball and a set of clubs, the object being to hit the ball into each of a series of nine or eighteen holes in turn, using the fewest possible strokes.
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To play golf.
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(sports) A ball game played by individuals competing against one another in which the object is to hit a ball into each of a series of (usually 18 or nine) holes in the minimum number of strokes.
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The letter G in the ICAO spelling alphabet.
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To play golf.
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The letter G in the ICAO spelling alphabet.
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Origin of golf

  • Middle English

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • The word is first known in English from the 15th century from Scots. Although the etymology is uncertain, the most likely origin is that it comes from the Middle Dutch colve or colf (“club”).

    From Wiktionary