Garnet meaning

gärnĭt
Frequency:
Any of several common, widespread aluminum or calcium silicate minerals occurring in two internally isomorphic series, (Mg, Mn, Fe)3 Al2 Si3 O12 and Ca3 (Cr, Al, Fe)2 Si3 O12 , generally crystallized, often embedded in igneous and metamorphic rocks, and colored red, brown, black, green, yellow, or white and used both as gemstones and as abrasives.
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A dark to very dark red.
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Any of a group of very hard silicate minerals having the general formula A3B2(SiO4)3, occurring chiefly as well-formed crystals in metamorphic rocks: red varieties are often used as gems, ordinary varieties as abrasives.
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A single-crystal synthetic form used in lasers, electronics, etc.
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A deep red.
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(naut.) A hoisting tackle for loading cargo.
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Any of several common red, brown, black, green, or yellow minerals having the general chemical formula A3B2SiO8 , where A is either calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), iron (Fe), or manganese (Mn) and B is either aluminum (Al), manganese, iron, chromium (Cr), or vanadium (V). Garnet crystals are dodecahedral in shape, transparent to semitransparent, and have a vitreous luster. They usually occur in metamorphic rocks but also occur in igneous and sedimentary rocks.
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(mineralogy) A hard transparent mineral that is often used as gemstones and abrasives.
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A dark red.

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Of a dark red colour.
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(nautical) A tackle for hoisting cargo in or out.
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Origin of garnet

  • Middle English from Old French grenate from grenat pomegranate-red probably from Latin grānātum pomegranate from neuter of grānātus seedy pomegranate

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English granate, from Old French grenate, from grenat (“pomegranate red”).

    From Wiktionary