Frock meaning

frŏk
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A woman's dress.
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A long loose outer garment, as that worn by artists and craftspeople; a smock.
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A robe worn by monks, friars, and other clerics; a habit.
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To clothe in a frock.
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To invest with clerical office.
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A robe worn by friars, monks, etc.
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Any of various other garments.
  • A tunic, mantle, or long coat formerly worn by men.
  • A smock or smock frock.
  • A girl's or woman's dress.
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To clothe in a frock.
verb
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(dialectal) A frog.
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A dress, a piece of clothing for a female, which consists of a skirt and a cover for the upper body.
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An outer garment worn by priests and other clericals, a habit.
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To clothe in a frock.
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To make a cleric.
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A woolen garment formerly worn by sailors; a jersey.
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Origin of frock

  • Middle English frok a monk's habit from Old French froc from Medieval Latin froccus of Germanic origin

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English frok, frokke, from Old French froc (“frock, a monk's gown or habit”) (compare Medieval Latin hrocus, roccus, rocus (“a coat”)), from Old Frankish *hroc, *hrok (“skirt, dress, robe”), from Proto-Germanic *hrukkaz (“robe, jacket, skirt, tunic”), from Proto-Indo-European *kreḱ- (“to weave”). Cognate with Old High German hroch, roch (“skirt, dress, cowl”) (German Rock (“skirt, coat”)), Saterland Frisian Rok (“skirt”), Dutch rok (“skirt, petticoat”), Old English rocc (“an overgarment, tunic, rochet”), Old Norse rokkr (“skirt, jacket”) (> Danish rok (“garment”)).

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English froke, variation of frogge (“frog”), from Old English frocga (“frog”). More at frog.

    From Wiktionary