Euro meaning

yo͝orō
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The basic monetary unit of the European Monetary Union and of various other countries.
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The basic unit of currency among participating European Union countries. See table at currency .
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Europe; European.

Eurocommunism.

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European, European and.

Euromart, Euro-American.

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European Union, European Monetary Union.

Euromart, eurozone.

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See EMU.
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The currency used by 12 Western European countries that agreed to give up their own currency and monetary policy. The countries using the euro are: Austria, Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Portugal, and Spain. The euro was introduced to bring the countries of Europe and their economies closer together and to reduce the cost of doing business among these countries. The European Central Bank was created to set monetary policy for the 12 member countries. The euro came into existence for financial transactions on January 1, 1999. Euro notes began circulating on January 1, 2002. The symbol is .
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The currency unit of the European Monetary Union. Symbol: €
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A coin with a face value of 1 euro.
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An abbreviation for European in any sense; e.g. "euro size"; "euro style pad".
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Macrobius robustus, a wallaroo (macropod species).
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Alternative spelling of euro, the currency and coin introduced 1999.
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(soccer, usually followed by the year) The UEFA European Football Championship, a European football competition held between the international teams of Europe every four years.
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Origin of euro

  • Adnyamathanha (Pama-Nyungan language of southern Australia) yuru, thuru or a kindred source in one or more neighboring Pama-Nyungan languages

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Sense 2, from such terms as Eurodollar originally, United States dollars deposited in Europe

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • After Europe

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • The name euro was the winner of a contest open to the general public to propose names for the new European currency, and as such is technically a neologism, although it obviously alludes to the common root of geographical names for the continent Europe, derived from Latin Europa, from Ancient Greek Εὐρώπη (Eurōpē), the name in Greek mythology of a princess, abducted by Zeus as a bull across the Bosphorus.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Adnyamathanha yuru, thuru.

    From Wiktionary