Elative meaning

ĕlə-tĭv
Of, relating to, or being the grammatical case indicating motion out of a place in some languages, as in Finnish hotellista, “out of the hotel.”
adjective
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The elative case.
noun
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A word or form in the elative case.
noun
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(grammar) In Semitic languages, the “adjective of superiority." In some languages such as Arabic, the concepts of comparative and superlative degree of an adjective are merged into a single form, the elative. How this form is understood or translated depends upon context and definiteness. In the absence of comparison, the elative conveys the notion of “greatest", “supreme."

The elative of كبير (kabí:r, “big") is أكبر (ákbar, “bigger/biggest, greater/greatest").

noun
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(grammar) In Finno-Ugric languages, one of the locative cases, expressing “out of," as in Finnish talosta, Hungarian házból (“out of the house"). Its opposite is the illative case (“into"). In Finnish, the case form is used also to express "out of" or "proximity" in a figurative sense which in English is often conveyed by the word "about".
noun
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Origin of elative

  • New Latin ēlātīvus from Latin ēlātus past participle of efferre to bring out elate –ive

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Latin elatum, past participle of effero (“to carry out or away")

    From Wiktionary

  • From Latin elatus (“exalted, lofty, high") +"Ž -ive

    From Wiktionary