Ego meaning

ēgō
Frequency:
Ego is defined as the view that a person has of himself.

An example of ego is the way that you look at yourself.

An example of ego is thinking you are the smartest person on earth.

noun
45
6
​the self, especially with a sense of self-importance.
  • 1998, Eckhart Tolle, A New Earth..
    When every thought absorbs your attention completely, when you are so identified with the voice in your head and the emotions that accompany it that you lose yourself in every thought and every emotion, then you are totally identified with form and therefore in the grip of ego. Ego is a conglomeration of recurring thought forms and conditioned mental-emotional patterns that are invested with a sense of I, a sense of self.
noun
19
3
The self; the individual as self-aware.
noun
16
0
That part of the psyche which experiences the external world, or reality, through the senses, organizes the thought processes rationally, and governs action: it mediates between the impulses of the id, the demands of the environment, and the standards of the superego.
noun
12
2
The self, especially as distinct from the world and other selves.
noun
11
3
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The self, especially as distinct from the world and other selves.
noun
4
0
In psychoanalytic theory, the division of the psyche that is conscious, is responsible for our feelings of selfhood, and most directly interacts with external reality.
noun
4
0
In psychoanalysis, the division of the psyche that is conscious, most immediately controls thought and behavior, and is most in touch with external reality.
noun
4
1
(psychology, Freudian) The most central part of the mind, which mediates with one's surroundings.
noun
2
0
Geo., goe.
anagrams
2
0
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Relating to goats.
prefix
2
0
The self, variously conceived as a spiritual substance on which experience is superimposed, the series of acts and mental states introspectively recognized, etc.
noun
0
0
Relating to the self.
prefix
0
1

Origin of ego

  • New Latin from Latin I eg in Indo-European roots Sense 2, translation of German Ich a special use of ich I, as a psychoanalytic term

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Latin ego (“I”). Chosen by Freud’s translator as a translation of his use of German Ich as a noun for this concept from the pronoun ich (“I”).

    From Wiktionary

  • From Latin ego (“I”).

    From Wiktionary