Dial meaning

dīəl, dīl
To tune in (a radio station, television channel, program, etc.)
verb
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To measure (something) with or as with a dial.
verb
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To call (a person, telephone number, etc.) on a telephone by using a dial, keypad, etc.
verb
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A graduated surface or face on which a measurement, such as speed, is indicated by a moving needle or pointer.
noun
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To measure with or as if with a dial.
verb
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The definition of a dial is the face of a watch, clock, a disc or a knob.

An example of a dial is a device for turning on a radio.

noun
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Dial is defined as to call someone by using a keypad, to tune in or to turn a knob.

An example of dial is to phone up a friend.

verb
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To point to, indicate, or register by means of a dial.
verb
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To control or select by means of a dial.

Dial a radio station.

verb
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To call (a party) on a telephone.
verb
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To signal (a number) in making a telephone call.

The program dials the number and then connects to the file server.

verb
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To use a dial.
verb
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To use a telephone.
verb
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A sundial.
noun
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The face of a watch or clock.
noun
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A usually graduated disk or knob for controlling some function, as the selection of a TV channel or the temperature of an oven.
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Dialect(al)
abbreviation
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Dialectic(al)
abbreviation
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(1) See rotary dial.
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A face, usually in the form of a disk, upon which some measurement is registered in graduations, and to which a pointer indicates a specific value. An analog clock or watch has a dial with 12 major graduations (hours) and 60 minor graduations (minutes and seconds). The second, minute, and hour hands sweep around the dial in a carefully synchronized manner.
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A device, usually in the form of a disk, that is manually rotated to make electrical connections or to control the operation of a machine.
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In telephone systems, a disk with holes in it that correspond to numbers 0 through 9 and that is mounted on a telephone set.The user places a call by addressing another telephone set identified by a sequence of numbers. In a simplified example, the caller sticks his finger in the hole associated with the first number in the sequence and rotates the dial until it reaches a hard stop and then releases it.As the dial returns to the starting position, it makes and breaks electrical contacts and sends a sequence of electrical pulses across a link to a switch.The switch counts the pulses and stores the number.When all numbers in the sequence have been dialed, the switch sets up the connection between the telephone sets and the conversation ensues. Dial pulse telephone sets are considered primitive today. Most telephone sets have keypads that generate either tones or digital signals. However, people still talk about dialing a telephone number.
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A graduated, circular scale over which a needle moves to show a measurement (such as speed).
noun
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A clock face.
noun
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noun
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A panel on a radio etc showing wavelengths or channels; a knob that is turned to change the wavelength etc.
noun
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A disk with finger holes on a telephone; used to select the number to be called.
noun
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(UK, dated) A person's face.
noun
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noun
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To measure or indicate something with a dial.
verb
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To control or select something with a dial.
verb
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To select a number, or to call someone, on a telephone.
verb
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(intransitive) To use a dial or a telephone.
verb
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(grammar) Abbreviation of dialect.
abbreviation
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A rotatable disk on a telephone with numbers and letters, used to signal the number to which a call is made.
noun
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Origin of dial

  • Middle English sundial, clock from Old French dyal from Medieval Latin diāle from neuter of diālis daily from Latin diēs day dyeu- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Its original meaning was 'sundial' and/or 'clock dial', from Latin diālis (“daily, concerning the day”), because of its use in telling the time of day.

    From Wiktionary