Cynic meaning

sĭnĭk
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The definition of a cynic is a person who thinks all actions are selfish and whose outlook is negative.

An example of a cynic is someone who thinks that people only volunteer so that they can receive a reward at the end.

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A person who believes all people are motivated by selfishness.
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A member of a school of ancient Greek philosophers who held virtue to be the only good and stressed independence from worldly needs and pleasures: they became critical of the rest of society and its material interests.
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A person whose outlook is scornfully and habitually negative.
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Cynical.
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Of or relating to the Cynics or their beliefs.
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A person who believes that all people are motivated by selfishness.
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A cynical person.
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A member of a sect of ancient Greek philosophers who believed virtue to be the only good and self-control to be the only means of achieving virtue.
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Of or like the Cynics or their doctrines.
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Cynical (in all senses)
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(not comparable) Relating to the Dog Star.

The cynic, or Sothic, year; cynic cycle.

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A person whose outlook is scornfully negative.
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A member of a sect of ancient Greek philosophers who believed virtue to be the only good and self-control to be the only means of achieving virtue.
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Of or relating to the Cynics.
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Origin of cynic

  • Latin cynicus Cynic philosopher from Greek kunikos from kuōn kun- dog kwon- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English cynike, cynicke, from Middle French cinicque, from Latin cynicus, from Ancient Greek κυνικός (kynikós), originally derived from the portico in Athens called Κυνόσαργες (Kunosarges), the earliest home of the Cynic school, later reinterpreted as a derivation of κύων (kúōn, “dog”), in a contemptuous allusion to the uncouth and aggressive manners adopted by the members of the school.

    From Wiktionary

  • Originated 1540–50 from Latin Cynicus (cynic philosopher), from Ancient Greek Κυνικός (Kynikós) (literally doglike, currish), from κύων (dog) + -ικός; see Proto-Indo-European *kwon-.

    From Wiktionary

  • The word may have first been applied to Cynics because of the nickname κύων kuōn (dog) given to Diogenes of Sinope, the prototypical Cynic.

    From Wiktionary