Conjure meaning

kŏnjər, kən-jo͝or
To imagine or picture in the mind.
verb
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To summon (a demon or spirit) as by a magic spell.
verb
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(obs.) To be sworn in a conspiracy.
verb
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(archaic) To call on or entreat solemnly, especially by an oath.
verb
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To perform magic tricks, especially by sleight of hand.
verb
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To summon a demon or spirit as by a magic spell.
verb
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To practice magic or legerdemain.
verb
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To call upon or entreat solemnly, esp. by some oath.
verb
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To bring about by conjuration.
verb
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(intransitive) To perform magic tricks.
verb
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To summon up using supernatural power, as a devil.
verb
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(intransitive) To practice black magic.
verb
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To evoke.
verb
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To make an urgent request to; to appeal to or beseech.
verb
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(African American Vernacular) A practice of magic; hoodoo; conjuration.
noun
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To conjure is defined as to call a spirit or to practice magic.

An example of to conjure is a group around a table trying to call a spirit from another world.

verb
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Of or practicing folk magic.

A conjure woman.

adjective
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conjure up
  • to cause to be or appear as by magic or legerdemain
  • to call to mind
    The music conjured up memories.
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of conjure

  • Middle English conjuren from Old French conjurer to use a spell from Late Latin coniūrāre to pray by something holy from Latin to swear together com- com- iūrāre to swear yewes- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English, from Old French conjurer, from Latin coniūrō (“I swear together; conspire”), from con- (“with, together”) + iūro (“I swear or take an oath”).

    From Wiktionary