Cloister meaning

kloistər
The definition of a cloister is a secluded monastery or any place of seclusion.

A secluded place where monks or nuns live is an example of a cloister.

noun
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To cloister is to seclude or shut in.

When you seclude your children inside your home and discourage them from leaving, this is an example of cloister.

verb
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A covered walk with an open colonnade on one side, running along the walls of buildings that face a quadrangle.
noun
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To confine in a cloister, voluntarily or not.
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verb
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To shut away from the world in or as if in a cloister; seclude.
verb
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A secluded, quiet place.
noun
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To seclude or confine in or as in a cloister.
verb
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To furnish or surround with a cloister.
verb
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A covered walk with an open colonnade on one side, running along the walls of buildings that face a quadrangle; especially:
  • Such arcade in a monastery.
  • Such arcade fitted with representations of the stages of Christ's Passion.
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noun
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(figuratively) The monastic life.
noun
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(intransitive) To become a Roman Catholic religious.
verb
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(intransitive) To deliberately withdraw from worldly things.
verb
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To provide with (a) cloister(s).

The architect cloistered the college just like the monastery which founded it.

verb
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To furnish (a building) with a cloister.
verb
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A place of religious seclusion: monastery or convent.
noun
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Monastic life.
noun
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Any place where one may lead a secluded life.
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An arched way or covered walk along the inside wall or walls of a monastery, convent, church, or college building, with a columned opening along one side leading to a courtyard or garden.
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Origin of cloister

  • Middle English cloistre from Old French alteration (influenced by cloison partition) of clostre from Latin claustrum enclosed place from claudere to close

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Recorded since c.1300, directly from Old French cloistre, clostre or via Old English clauster, both from Medieval Latin claustrum "portion of monastery closed off to laity," from Latin claustrum, "place shut in, bar, bolt, enclosure", a noun use of the past participle (neutral inflection) of claudere ‘to close’.

    From Wiktionary