Cathode-ray-tube meaning

kăthōd-rā
The definition of a cathode-ray tube (CRT) is a vacuum tube that creates an image on a fluorescent screen when struck by an electromagnetically charged beam.

An example of a cathode-ray tube is what televisions and computers used to create images before LED and LCD were introduced.

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A vacuum tube, used in monitors and televisions, in which a hot cathode emits electrons that are accelerated as a beam through a relatively high voltage anode, further focused or deflected electrostatically or electromagnetically, and allowed to fall on a phosphorescent screen.
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A sealed tube in which electrons are emitted by a heated, negatively charged element (the cathode), and travel in a beam toward a positively charged plate (the anode). Depending on the properties of the plate and the speed of the electrons, cathode-ray tubes can generate x-rays, visible light, and other frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. They are central to most television screens, in which the electron beams form images on a phosphor-coated screen.
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See CRT.
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(electronics) A vacuum tube that displays still or moving images (such as for a television), by controlling the direction of a cathode ray emitted towards the front of the tube. The front is coated by a layer of fluorescent material, so that it emits light when struck by the beam.
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A vacuum tube in which a stream of electrons is electromagnetically focused on a fluorescent screen, producing lighted dots: such tubes are used as oscilloscopes and picture tubes: abbrev. CRT.
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