Camber meaning

kămbər
Frequency:
A setting of automobile wheels in which they are closer together at the bottom than at the top.
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A slight convex curve of a surface, as of a road, a ship's deck, or a beam.
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In automotive wheel alignment, a slight tilt given to each of a pair of wheels on an axle: positive camber indicates that the bottoms are closer together than the tops, and negative camber indicates the opposite situation.
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(aeron.) The arching curve of an airfoil from the leading edge to the trailing edge.
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To arch slightly; curve convexly.
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A slight convexity, arching or curvature of a surface of a road, a beam, roof deck, ship's deck etc., so that liquids will flow off the sides.
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The slope of a curved road created to minimize the effect of centrifugal force.
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(architecture) An upward concavity in the underside of a beam, girder, or lintel; also, a slight upward concavity in a straight arch.
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The curvature of an airfoil.
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(nautical) A small enclosed dock in which timber for masts (etc.) is kept to weather.
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To curve upwards in the middle.
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To adjust the camber of the wheels of a vehicle.

Because he cambered the tires too much, he had less control on the turns.

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To arch or cause to arch slightly.
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(automotive) A vertical alignment of the wheels of a road vehicle with positive camber signifying that the wheels are closer together at the bottom than at the top.
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Origin of camber

  • From Middle English caumber curved from Old North French dialectal caumbre from Latin camur perhaps from Greek kamara vault

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Old French cambre (“bent”), from Latin camurum, from camur (“arched”).

    From Wiktionary