Cabin meaning

kăbĭn
Frequency:
A small, roughly built house; a cottage.
noun
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To confine or live in or as if in a small space or area.
verb
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2
Any simple, small structure designed for a brief stay, as for overnight.

Tourist cabins.

noun
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A private room on a ship, as a bedroom or office.
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2
A small, one-story house built simply or crudely, as of logs.
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The definition of cabin means a small house in the woods or another rural setting, often made of wood.

A log house in a green field is an example of a cabin.

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The cabin is defined by an enclosed space on a boat or airplane.

The area where customers and crew sit on an airplane is an example of a cabin.

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(US) A small dwelling characteristic of the frontier, especially when built from logs with simple tools and not constructed by professional builders, but by those who meant to live in it.

Abraham Lincoln was born in a log cabin.

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(informal) A chalet or lodge, especially one that can hold large groups of people.
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A compartment on land, usually comprised of logs.
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A private room on a ship.

The captain's cabin.

Passengers shall remain in their cabins.

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The interior of a boat, enclosed to create a small room, particularly for sleeping.
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The passenger area of an airplane.
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(travel, aviation) The section of a passenger plane having the same class of service.
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(rail transport, informal) A signal box.
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A small room; an enclosed place.
noun
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To place in a cabin.
verb
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To confine in or as in a cabin; cramp.
verb
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The enclosed space in an aircraft or spacecraft for the crew, passengers, or cargo.
noun
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2
A roofed section of a small boat, as a pleasure cruiser, for the passengers or crew.
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The enclosed section of an aircraft, where the passengers sit; also, the section housing the crew or used for cargo.
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Origin of cabin

  • Middle English caban from Old French cabane from Old Provençal cabana from Late Latin capanna

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English caban, cabane, from Old French cabane, from Medieval Latin capanna (“a cabin”).

    From Wiktionary