Bushel meaning

bo͝oshəl
A large amount; a great deal.

We have bushels of time, so relax.

noun
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(colloquial) A large indefinite quantity.
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The definition of a bushel is a U.S. measure used for dry goods that is equal to 64 pints, or a British measure for dry goods and liquids that is equal to 8 imperial gallons, or an informal way of saying a large amount.

When you have 64 pints of wheat, this is an example of a bushel of wheat.

When you have 8 imperial gallons of maple syrup, this is an example of a bushel.

When you have a lot of money, this is an example of a bushel of money.

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A container with the capacity of a bushel.
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To alter or mend (clothing).
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A unit of dry measure for grain, fruit, etc., equal to 32 dry quarts or 4 pecks (35.2384 dry liters or 1.2445 cubic feet): abbrev. bu.
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A weight taken as the equivalent of one bushel.
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A large amount Abbrev. bu.
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To repair, renovate, or alter (esp. garments)
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A dry measure, containing four pecks, eight gallons (36.4 L), or thirty-two quarts.

The Winchester bushel, formerly used in England, contained 2150.42 cubic inches, being the volume of a cylinder 181/2 inches in internal diameter and eight inches in depth. The standard bushel measures, prepared by the United States Government and distributed to the States, hold each 77.6274 pounds of distilled water, at 39.8° Fahr. and 30 inches atmospheric pressure, being the equivalent of the Winchester bushel. The imperial bushel now in use in England is larger than the Winchester bushel, containing 2218.2 cubic inches, or 80 pounds of water at 62° Fahr.

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A vessel of the capacity of a bushel, used in measuring; a bushel measure.
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A quantity that fills a bushel measure; as, a heap containing ten bushels of apples.

In the United States a large number of articles, bought and sold by the bushel, are measured by weighing, the number of pounds that make a bushel being determined by State law or by local custom. For some articles, as apples, potatoes, etc., heaped measure is required in measuring a bushel.

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The iron lining in the nave of a wheel. [Eng.] In the United States it is called a box.
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A container holding one bushel.
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Origin of bushel

  • Probably from German bosseln to do odd jobs alteration (perhaps influenced by bosseln to emboss) of basteln to rig up, mend probably from Bast bast fiber (used to make rope) from Middle High German bast from Old High German

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English from Anglo-Norman bussel variant of Old French boissiel from boisse one sixth of a bushel of Celtic origin

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Via French boisseau, from Old French boissel, from boisse, a grain measure based on Vulgar Latin (Gallic dialect) *bostia (“handful”), from Gaulish *bosta (“palm of the hand”); see also Breton boz (“hollow of the hand”) and Old Irish bass.

    From Wiktionary