Browse meaning

brouz
To feed on leaves, young shoots, and other vegetation; graze.
verb
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To look for information on the Internet.
verb
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2
To view or look over casually any collection or gathering, as in searching for items of interest.
verb
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(1) On the Web, browse means to move from link to link to view the contents of Web pages. See Web browser.
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The definition of browse means to look at someone or something casually.

An example of browse is window shopping.

An example of browse is looking around a room to find someone.

verb
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To scan, to casually look through in order to find items of interest, especially without knowledge of what to look for beforehand.
verb
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To move about while sampling, such as with food or products on display.
verb
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(computing) To navigate through hyperlinked documents on a computer, usually with a browser.
verb
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(intransitive, of an animal) To move about while eating parts of plants, especially plants other than pasture, such as shrubs or trees.
verb
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To feed on, as pasture; to pasture on; to graze.
verb
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Young shoots and twigs.
noun
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Fodder for cattle and other animals.
noun
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To look through or over (something) casually.

Browsed the newspaper; browsing the gift shops for souvenirs.

verb
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To read (websites) casually on the Internet.
verb
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Young twigs, leaves, and shoots that are fit for animals to eat.
noun
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An act of browsing.
noun
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Leaves, twigs, and young shoots of trees or shrubs, which animals feed on.
noun
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The act of browsing.
noun
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To nibble at (leaves, twigs, etc.)
verb
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To graze on.
verb
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To examine casually; skim.
verb
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To nibble at leaves, twigs, etc.
verb
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(comput.) To look through information on (the Internet, a website, etc.), as with a browser.
verb
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(comput.) To look through information on the Internet, as with a browser.
verb
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Origin of browse

  • Probably from obsolete French broust young shoot from Old French brost of Germanic origin

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle French brouster, from Old French broster.

    From Wiktionary