Bromine meaning

brōmēn
A chemical element, one of the halogens, usually in the form of a reddish-brown, corrosive liquid, that volatilizes to form a vapor that has an unpleasant odor and is very irritating to mucous membranes: used in making dyes, in photography, and, in the form of certain compounds, in antiknock motor fuel: symbol, Br; at. no. 35
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A reddish-brown volatile element of the halogen group found in compounds occurring in ocean water. The pure form is a nonmetallic liquid that gives off a highly irritating vapor. It is used to make dyes, sedatives, and photographic film. Atomic weight 79.904; atomic number 35; melting point 7.2°C; boiling point 58.78°C; specific gravity 3.12; valence 1, 3, 5, 7.
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(uncountable) A nonmetallic chemical element (symbol Br) with an atomic number of 35; one of the halogens.
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(countable) A bromine atom in a molecule.
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A dense, volatile, corrosive, reddish-brown, nonmetallic liquid halogen element that exists as a diatomic molecule, Br2 having a highly irritating vapor. Chiefly isolated from brines, it is used in producing fumigants, dyes, water purification compounds, and photographic chemicals. Atomic weight 79.904; atomic number 35; melting point −7.2°C; boiling point 58.8°C; density of gas 7.59 grams per liter; specific gravity (liquid, at 20°C) 3.12; valence 1, 3, 5, 7.
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Origin of bromine

  • French brome (from Greek brōmos stench) –ine

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From French brome, from Ancient Greek βρῶμος (brōmos, “stink”)

    From Wiktionary