Brogue meaning

brōg
A strong dialectal accent, especially a strong Irish or Scottish accent when speaking English.
noun
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A strong dialectal accent. In Ireland it used to be a term for Irish spoken with a strong English accent, but gradually changed to mean English spoken with a strong Irish accent as English control of Ireland gradually increased and Irish waned as the standard language.
noun
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The pronunciation peculiar to a dialect, esp. that of English as spoken by the Irish.
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(intransitive) To speak with a brogue (accent).
verb
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The definition of a brogue is a strong accent, or a heavy oxford shoe, or a shoe of untanned leather.

An Irish accent when speaking English is an example of a brogue.

A man's oxford shoe with perforations and a wing tip is an example of a brogue.

A leather shoe made of untanned leather that used to be worn frequently in Ireland is an example of a brogue.

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A heavy shoe of untanned leather, formerly worn in Scotland and Ireland.
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A strong oxford shoe, usually with ornamental perforations or wingtips.
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A coarse shoe of untanned leather, formerly worn in Ireland and Scotland.
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A man's heavy oxford shoe, usually with decorative perforations and a wing tip.
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A strong Oxford shoe, with ornamental perforations and wing tips.
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(dated) A heavy shoe of untanned leather.
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(intransitive) To walk.
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To kick.
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To punch a hole in, as with an awl.
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(dialect) To fish for eels by disturbing the waters.
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Origin of brogue

  • Irish Scottish Gaelic bróg from Old Irish bróc shoe possibly from Old Norse brōk legging or from Old English brōc breech
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Probably from the brogues worn by farmers
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Irish bróg (“boot, shoe”). The "accent" sense may instead be derived from Old Irish barrog (“a hold (on the tongue)”).
    From Wiktionary
  • Possibly from French brouiller
    From Wiktionary