Zinc meaning

zĭngk
Zinc is a metallic element with a blue-white color used as a protective coating for iron and to make metal alloys like nickel silver.

An example of zinc is to glavanize by covering iron with zinc.

noun
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To coat or treat with zinc; galvanize.
verb
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A bluish-white, metallic chemical element, usually found in combination, used as a protective coating for iron, as a constituent in various alloys, as an electrode in electric batteries, and, in the form of salts, in medicines: symbol, Zn; at. no. 30
noun
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To coat or treat with zinc; galvanize.
verb
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A shiny, bluish-white metallic element that is brittle at room temperature but is malleable when heated. It is used in alloys such as brass and bronze, as a coating for iron and steel, and in various household objects. Zinc is essential to human and animal growth. Atomic number 30; atomic weight 65.39; melting point 419.4°C; boiling point 907°C; specific gravity 7.133 (25°C); valence 2.
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See ZINK.
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A chemical element (symbol Zn) with an atomic number of 30.
noun
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(rare) To electroplate with zinc.
verb
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(rare) To coat with sunblock incorporating zinc oxide.
verb
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A bluish-white, lustrous metallic element that is brittle at room temperature but malleable with heating. It is used to form a wide variety of alloys including brass, bronze, various solders, and nickel silver, in galvanizing iron and other metals, for electric fuses, anodes, meter cases and batteries, and in roofing, gutters, and various household objects. US pennies minted after 1982 consist of a copper-clad zinc core. Atomic number 30; atomic weight 65.38; melting point 419.53°C; boiling point 907°C; specific gravity 7.134 (at 25°C); valence 2.
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Origin of zinc

  • German Zink possibly from Zinke spike (so called because it becomes jagged in the furnace) from Middle High German zinke from Old High German zinko

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From German Zink, related to Zinke (“point, prong"), from Old High German zint (“a jag, point"), from Proto-Germanic *tinduz, *tindaz (“prong, pinnacle"), from Proto-Indo-European *(e)dont- (“tooth, projection"), see also Dutch tinne (“battlement"), German Zinne (“pinnacle, battlement"), Danish tinde (“pinnacle, battlement"), Swedish tinne (“tooth of a rake"), Icelandic tindur (“spike, tooth of a rake or harrow, pinnacle, peak, battlement").

    From Wiktionary