Xerography meaning

zĭ-rŏg'rə-fē
A dry photographic or photocopying process in which a negative image formed by a resinous powder on an electrically charged plate is electrically transferred to and thermally fixed as positive on a paper or other copying surface.
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A process for copying printed material, pictures, etc. onto paper, in which a latent image of the original material is transferred by the action of light onto an electrically charged surface to which the image attracts oppositely charged dry ink particles: the particles are then fused into place on the copy paper, reproducing the original image.
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From the Greek xeros, meaning dry, and graphos, meaning written. Also known as electropho-tography. A process for copying material through the production of photographic images.The latent image is transferred by the action of light on a photoconductive insulated drum to which the image attracts oppositely charged dry ink particles that are then fused in place on paper. The process was invented and patented in 1938 by Chester Carlson (1906
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Origin of xerography

  • xero- +"Ž -graphy
    From Wiktionary