Wont Definition

wônt, wōnt, wŭnt
wonted, wonting, wonts
adjective
Accustomed.
He was wont to rise early.
Webster's New World
Likely.
Chaotic as holidays are wont to be.
American Heritage
Wont means accustomed or used to.
An example of wont used as an adjective is in the phrase, "wont to desire ice cream," which means likely to want some ice cream.
YourDictionary

(designating habitual behaviour) Accustomed, apt (to doing something).

He is wont to complain loudly about his job.
Like a 60-yard Percy Harvin touchdown run or a Joe Haden interception return, Urban Meyer's jaw-dropping resignation Saturday was, as he's wont to say, “a game-changer." "” Sunday December 27, 2009, Stewart Mandel, INSIDE COLLEGE FOOTBALL, Meyer's shocking resignation rocks college coaching landscape.
Wiktionary
noun
wonts
Usual practice; habit.
Webster's New World
The definition of wont is a practice or something that is usually done.
An example of a wont is the baptizing of a baby in a Catholic family.
YourDictionary

One's habitual way of doing things, practice, custom.

He awoke at the crack of dawn, as was his wont.
Wiktionary
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verb
wonted, wonting, wonts
To accustom.
Webster's New World
To be accustomed.
Webster's New World
To be in the habit of doing something.
American Heritage
Wont is defined as to be used to doing something or to get used to doing something.
An example of to wont is to be used to waking up each morning at 6 a.m.
YourDictionary
Synonyms:

Origin of Wont

  • Middle English past participle of wonen to be used to, dwell won1

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Origin uncertain: apparently a conflation of wone and wont (participle adjective, below).

    From Wiktionary

  • Old English Ä¡ewunod, past participle of Ä¡ewunian.

    From Wiktionary

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