Vulgate meaning

vŭlgāt, -gĭt
The common speech of a people; the vernacular.
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A widely accepted text or version of a work.
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The Latin edition or translation of the Bible made by Saint Jerome at the end of the fourth century ad , now used in a revised form as the Roman Catholic authorized version.
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(proper) A Latin version of the Bible prepared by St. Jerome in the 4th cent., authorized as the official biblical text of the Roman Catholic Church.
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The vernacular, or common speech.
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Of or in the Vulgate.
adjective
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Commonly accepted; popular; specif., of or in the vernacular, or common speech.
adjective
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The vernacular language of a people.
noun
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The Latin translation of the Bible (from Hebrew and Greek) made by Saint Jerome.
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Origin of vulgate

  • Medieval Latin Vulgāta from Late Latin vulgāta (editiō) popular (edition) from Latin feminine past participle of vulgāre to make known to all from vulgus the common people

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Latin versio vulgata (“edition in vernacular language")

    From Wiktionary