Vocative meaning

vŏkə-tĭv
Relating to, characteristic of, or used in calling.
adjective
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Of, relating to, or being a grammatical case in certain inflected languages that indicates the person or thing being addressed.
adjective
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The vocative case.
noun
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A word or form in the vocative case.
noun
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(gram.) Designating, of, or in the case of nouns, pronouns, or adjectives used in direct address to indicate the person or thing addressed.
adjective
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The vocative case: this case is expressed by a change in form in languages such as Latin and by word order and intonation in English (Ex.: “Bill” in “Bill, don't do that!”)
noun
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A word or phrase in this case.
noun
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Of or pertaining to calling; used in calling or vocation.
adjective
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(grammar) Used in address; appellative; "” said of that case or form of the noun, pronoun, or adjective, in which a person or thing is addressed; as, Domine, O Lord.
adjective
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(grammar) The vocative case.
noun
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Origin of vocative

  • Middle English vocatif from Old French from Latin vocātīvus (cāsus) vocative (case) from vocātus past participle of vocāre to call vocation

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Late Middle English, from Middle French vocatif, from Latin vocativus (“calling"), from vocatus (“invocation"), from vocare (“to call"), from Proto-Indo-European *wek-, *wekÊ·-, *wokÊ·- (“give vocal utterance, speak"). See Latin vōx.

    From Wiktionary