Vitamin-k definitions

A fat-soluble vitamin, occurring in leafy green vegetables, tomatoes, and egg yolks, that promotes blood clotting and prevents hemorrhaging. It exists in several related forms, such as K1 and K2 .
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A yellow viscous oil, C31 H46 O2 , found in leafy green vegetables or made synthetically, used by the body in the synthesis of prothrombin and in veterinary medicine as an antidote to certain poisons.
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A crystalline compound, C41 H56 O2 , isolated from putrefied fish meal or from various intestinal bacteria, used to stop hemorrhaging and in veterinary medicine as an antidote to certain poisons.
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A fat-soluble vitamin, synthesized constantly by intestinal bacteria in mammals and occurring in certain green vegetables, fish meal, etc., that promotes blood clotting and is required for the synthesis of prothrombin by the liver: the two naturally occurring varieties are vitamin K1, C31H46O2, found chiefly in alfalfa leaves, and vitamin K2, C41H56O2, found chiefly in fish meal: vitamin K3 (menadione) and vitamin K4 are prepared synthetically.
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A fat-soluble vitamin, found in leafy green vegetables and some animal products and produced by intestinal bacteria, that plays an essential role in blood clotting. It exists in two main forms, K1 and K2 .
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A yellow viscous oil, C31 H46 O2 , found in leafy green vegetables and used by the body in the synthesis of prothrombin.
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A synthetic analog of this vitamin, used in the treatment of some coagulation disorders and to prevent hemorrhagic disease in newborns. In veterinary medicine, it is used as an antidote to poisoning by anticoagulant rodenticides.
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Any of several fat-soluble compounds found in liver and other animal products and in some fermented foods and synthesized in the body by intestinal bacteria.
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Any of a group of fat-soluble vitamins that are involved in the formation of prothrombin and other clotting factors in the liver and are essential for normal clotting of the blood. (The K is derived from the German word koagulation. ) Vitamin K is also involved in bone formation and repair. Two forms occur naturally: vitamin K1 , which is synthesized by plants, and vitamin K2 , which is mainly synthesized by intestinal bacteria. The other forms are synthetic substances with similar chemical structures.
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The major dietary form of vitamin K that is synthesized in plants and found primarily in green, leafy vegetables such as alfalfa and in vegetable oils. It can be made synthetically and is given orally to treat prothrombin deficiency that results from heparin and other anticoagulant drugs. Also called phylloquinone. Chemical formula: C31H46O2.
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A form of vitamin K that is synthesized by bacteria in the intestine and is also found in fish and other foods. Also called menaquinone. Chemical formula: C41H56O2.
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Either of several related fat-soluble vitamins, found in leafy green vegetables, essential for blood clotting.
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(slang) The drug ketamine.
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