Vignette meaning

vĭn-yĕt'
Vignette refers to a picture or illustration that is faint and that blends with its background, or to a decoration in a book.

An example of a vignette is an illustration in a book.

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The definition of a vignette is a brief skit or retelling of something that occurred.

An example of a vignette is a brief skit during intermission performed for the audience's entertainment.

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A decorative design placed at the beginning or end of a book or chapter of a book or along the border of a page.
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An unbordered picture, often a portrait, that shades off into the surrounding color at the edges.
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To provide (a photograph or image) with indistinct or fading edges.
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To describe in a brief way.
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An ornamental design (originally one of vine leaves, tendrils, and grapes) or illustration used on a page of a book, magazine, etc., as at the beginning or end of a chapter or section.
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A picture, photograph, film image, etc. with no definite border, shading off gradually at the edges into the background.
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To make a vignette of.
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(architecture) A running ornament consisting of leaves and tendrils, used in Gothic architecture.
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(printing) A decorative design, originally representing vine branches or tendrils, at the head of a chapter, of a manuscript or printed book, or in a similar position.
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(by extension) Any small borderless picture in a book, especially an engraving, photograph, or the like, which vanishes gradually at the edge.
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(by extension) A short story that presents a scene or tableau, or paints a picture.
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The small picture on a postage stamp.
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(photography) The characteristic of a camera lens, either by deficiency in design or by mismatch of the lens with the film format, to produce an image smaller than the film's frame with a crudely focused border. Photographers may deliberately choose this characteristic for a special effect.
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To make, as an engraving or a photograph, with a border or edge gradually fading away.
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Origin of vignette

  • French from Old French diminutive of vigne vine (from the use of vine tendrils in decorative borders) vine
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • First attested in 1751. From French vignette, diminutive of vigne (“vine"), from Latin vÄ«nea, from vÄ«num (“wine"). Replaced earlier vinet.
    From Wiktionary