Vicar definition

vĭkər
A cleric in charge of a chapel in the Episcopal Church of the United States.
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The pope, regarded as earthly representative of Christ.
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An Anglican or Roman Catholic cleric who acts for or represents another, often higher-ranking member of the clergy.
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An Anglican parish priest in a parish where historically someone other than the priest was entitled to the tithes.
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(archaic) A person who acts in place of another; deputy.
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(anglican ch.) A parish priest who is not a rector and receives a stipend instead of the tithes.
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(episcopal ch.) A minister in charge of a chapel.
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A church officer acting as a deputy of a bishop.
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In the Church of England, the priest of a parish, receiving a salary or stipend but not tithes.
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In the Roman Catholic and some other churches, a cleric acting as local representative of a higher ranking member of the clergy.
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A person acting on behalf of, or is representing another person.
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The definition of a vicar is a religious official who acts in place of another, or the priest of a Church of England parish, or a minister in charge of an Episcopalian chapel in the United States.

A priest who acts for a bishop in the Roman Catholic Church is an example of a vicar.

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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
vicar
Plural:
vicars

Origin of vicar

  • Middle English from Old French vicaire from Latin vicārius vicarious, a substitute from vicis genitive of vix change weik-2 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Latin vicārius (“vicarious, substitute").

    From Wiktionary