Vegetable meaning

vĕjtə-bəl, vĕjĭ-tə-
Frequency:
The definition of a vegetable is a person that is no longer able to mentally function.

An example of a vegetable is someone with a brain injury that cannot live without life support.

noun
12
1
Vegetable is the edible root, tuber, leaf, stem, seed or flower of a plant.

An example of a vegetable is spinach.

noun
7
1
Vegetable means anything having to do with plants.

An example of vegetable is a soup made primarily with vegetables, “vegetable soup.”

adjective
5
1
Of or relating to vegetables.
adjective
4
0
Of, relating to, or derived from plants or a plant.

Vegetable dyes.

adjective
3
0
Advertisement
Made from or with edible plants or plant parts.

Vegetable lasagna.

adjective
2
0
Growing or reproducing like a plant.
adjective
2
0
Of, or having the nature of, plants in general.

The vegetable kingdom.

adjective
2
0
Of, having the nature of, made from, consisting of, or produced by edible vegetables.
adjective
1
0
Broadly, any plant, as distinguished from animal or inorganic matter.
noun
1
0
Advertisement
A plant that is cultivated for an edible part, such as the leaf of spinach, the root of the carrot, or the stem of celery.
1
0
An edible part of one of these plants.
1
0
Any plant.
noun
1
0
A plant raised for some edible part of it, such as the leaves, roots, fruit or flowers, but excluding any plant considered to be a fruit, grain, or spice in the culinary sense.
noun
1
0
The edible part of such a plant.
noun
1
0
Advertisement
(figuratively) A person whose brain (or, infrequently, body) has been damaged so that they cannot interact with the surrounding environment; a brain-dead person.
noun
1
0
Of or relating to plants.
adjective
1
0
One who is severely impaired mentally and physically, as by brain injury or disease.
noun
0
0
A person thought of as like a vegetable, as because of leading a dull, unthinking existence or because of having lost consciousness, the use of the mind, etc.
noun
0
0

Origin of vegetable

  • From Middle English living and growing as plants do from Old French from Medieval Latin vegetābilis from Late Latin enlivening from Latin vegetāre to enliven from vegetus lively from vegēre to be lively weg- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • (1350-1400) Middle English (adj.), from Latin vegetabilis (“able to live and grow"), derived from Latin vegetare (“to enliven")

    From Wiktionary