Vaccine meaning

văk-sēn', văk'sēn'
The definition of a vaccine is an inoculation used to stimulate antibodies in your body so you will develop immunity against a certain disease.

A shot you get that is intended to make you immune to catching the measles is an example of a vaccine.

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A software program designed to detect and stop the progress of computer viruses.
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A preparation from the cowpox virus that protects against smallpox when administered to an individual.
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A preparation of a weakened or killed pathogen, such as a bacterium or virus, or of a portion of the pathogen's structure, that stimulates immune cells to recognize and attack it, especially through antibody production. Most vaccines are given orally or by intramuscular or subcutaneous injection.
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(immunology) A substance given to stimulate the body's production of antibodies and provide immunity against a disease, prepared from the agent that causes the disease, or a synthetic substitute.
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Lymph, or a preparation of this, from a cowpox vesicle, containing the causative virus and used in vaccination against cowpox or smallpox.
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Any preparation of killed microorganisms, weakened viruses, etc. that is introduced into the body to produce immunity to a specific disease by causing the formation of antibodies.
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Of cowpox or vaccination.
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A preparation of a weakened or killed pathogen, such as a bacterium or virus, or of a portion of the pathogen's structure, that is administered to prevent or treat infection by the pathogen and that functions by stimulating the production of an immune response.
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Origin of vaccine

  • From Latin vaccīnus of cows from vacca cow
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Latin vaccinus, from vacca (“cow") (because of early use of the cowpox virus against smallpox). Cf. New or Scientific Latin (variola) vaccÄ«na, or "cowpox".
    From Wiktionary