Tribune meaning

trĭbyo͝on, trĭ-byo͝on
An officer of ancient Rome elected by the plebeians to protect their rights from arbitrary acts of the patrician magistrates.
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A protector or champion of the people.
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A raised platform or dais from which a speaker addresses an assembly.
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The usually domed or vaulted apse of a basilica.
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In ancient Rome,
  • Any of several magistrates, esp. one appointed to protect the interests and rights of plebeians against violation by patricians.
  • Any of the six officers who rotated command over a legion for a period of a year.
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A champion of the people.
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The domed or vaulted apse in a Christian church that houses the bishop's throne.
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A place or an opportunity to speak, to express one's opinion, a platform.

This new magazine's goal is to give a tribune to unmarried mothers.

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A raised platform or dais for speakers.
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Origin of tribune

  • French from Old French part of a church, speaking platform from Old Italian tribuna from Medieval Latin tribūna alteration of Latin tribūnal tribunal

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English from Old French tribun from Latin tribūnus from tribus tribe tribe

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Latin tribunus, related to tribus (“tribe") (from its original sense of "leader of a tribe").

    From Wiktionary