Tartar meaning

tärtər
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An irritable, violent, intractable person.
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A reddish acid compound, chiefly potassium bitartrate, found in the juice of grapes and deposited on the sides of casks during winemaking.
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Cream of tartar, esp. the crude form present in grape juice and forming a reddish or whitish, crustlike deposit (argol) in wine casks.
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A hard deposit on the teeth, consisting of saliva proteins, food deposits, various salts, as calcium phosphate, etc.; dental calculus.
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A hard yellowish deposit on the teeth, consisting of organic secretions and food particles deposited in various salts, such as calcium carbonate.
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A hard yellowish deposit on the teeth, consisting of organic secretions and food particles deposited in various salts, such as calcium carbonate.
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A reddish acid compound consisting of a tartrate of potassium, found in the juice of grapes and deposited on the sides of wine casks.
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A red compound deposited during wine making; mostly potassium hydrogen tartrate - a source of cream of tartar.
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Alternative spelling of Tatar.
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A member of the various tribes and their descendants of Tartary, such as Turks, Mongols and Manchus.
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(figuratively, dated) A person of a keen, irritable temper.
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One of the tributaries of the Kura River, mostly flowing through the Nagorno-Karabakh Republic.
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(dentistry) A hard yellowish deposit on the teeth, consisting of organic secretions and food particles deposited in various salts, such as calcium carbonate.
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Origin of tartar

  • Middle English Tartre from Old French Tartare from Medieval Latin Tartarus alteration (influenced by Latin Tartarus Tartarus) of Persian Tātār Tatar

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English tartre potassium bitartrate from Old French from Medieval Latin tartarum argol from Medieval Greek tartaron

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Via Middle English, via Medieval Latin from Medieval Greek τάρταρον (tartaron), probably from Arabic[Arabic?].

    From Wiktionary

  • (dated) A fearsome or angrily violent person.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Armenian Թարթառ (Tʿartʿaṙ).

    From Wiktionary