Star meaning

stär
To perform brilliantly; excel.
verb
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A graphic design having five or more radiating points, often used as a symbol of rank or merit.
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Any of the celestial bodies visible to the naked eye at night as fixed, usually twinkling points of light, including binary and multiple star systems.
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A planet or constellation of the zodiac believed in astrology to influence personal destiny.
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A large, spherical celestial body consisting of a mass of gas that is hot enough to sustain nuclear fusion and thus produce radiant energy. Stars begin their life cycle as clouds of gas and dust called nebulae and develop, through gravitation and accretion, into increasingly hot and dense protostars . In order to reach the temperature at which nuclear reactions are ignited (about 5 million degrees K), a protostar must have at least 80 times the mass of Jupiter. For most of its life a star fuses hydrogen into helium in its core, during which period it is known as a dwarf star and is classed according to its surface temperature and luminosity (or spectral type) on a continuum called the main sequence in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. When a star exhausts the hydrogen in its core, it typically develops into one of several non-main-sequence forms depending on how massive it is. Smaller stars, with masses less than eight times that of the Sun, become red giants and end their lives, after blowing away their outer layers, as white dwarfs . More massive stars become supergiants and end their lives, after exploding in a supernova, as either a neutron star or a black hole .
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Any of the luminous celestial objects seen as points of light in the sky; esp., any self-luminous celestial body having continuous nuclear reactions which send heat, light, etc. in all directions.
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Any small luminous dot appearing in the cloudless portion of the night sky, especially with a fixed location relative to other such dots.
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(astronomy) A luminous celestial body, made up of plasma (particularly hydrogen and helium) and having a spherical shape. Depending on context the sun may or may not be included.
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(geometry) A concave polygon with regular, pointy protrusions and indentations, generally with five or six points.
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(acting) An actor in a leading role.

Many Hollywood stars attended the launch party.

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An exceptionally talented or famous person, often in a specific field; a celebrity.

His teacher tells us he is a star pupil.

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(printing) An asterisk (*).
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A symbol used to rate hotels, films, etc. with a higher number of stars denoting better quality.
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A simple dance, or part of a dance, where a group of four dancers each put their right or left hand in the middle and turn around in a circle. You call them right-hand stars or left-hand stars, depending on the hand which is in the middle.
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(astrology) A planet supposed to influence one's destiny.

What's in the stars for you today? Find out in our horoscope.

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A star-shaped ornament worn on the breast to indicate rank or honour.
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A composition of combustible matter used in the heading of rockets, in mines, etc., which, exploding in the air, presents a starlike appearance.
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To appear as a featured performer or headliner, especially in an entertainment program.
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To mark with a star or asterisk.
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To set or adorn with stars, or bright, radiating bodies; to bespangle.
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Star is defined as a bright point of light in the sky or a five-sided drawing that is meant to resemble the points of light in the sky.

An example of star is what makes up the Big Dipper constellation.

An example of star is a drawing of a five-sided point of light.

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The definition of a star is a famous person or celebrity.

An example of a star is Brad Pitt.

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To star is to take a lead role or take all the attention, especially in a movie or film.

An example of star is when you play the love interest in a romantic comedy movie.

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A white spot on the forehead of a horse.
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Outstanding or famous, especially in performing something.

A star researcher; a star figure skater.

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Of or relating to a star or stars.
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To present or feature (a performer) in a leading role.
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To play the leading role in a theatrical or film production.
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To do an outstanding job; perform excellently.
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To mark or set with stars as a decoration.
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To mark with one or more stars as a grade of quality.
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To mark with an asterisk.
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To present or feature (an actor or actress) in a leading role.
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To perform as a star, as in a theatrical production.
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Having exceptional skill and talent; outstanding; excelling others; leading.

A star performer.

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Of a star or stars.
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A conventionalized flat figure having (usually five or six) symmetrical projecting points, regarded as a representation of a star of the sky.
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Any mark, shape, emblem, or the like resembling such a figure, often used as an award, symbol of rank or authority, etc.
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A person who excels or performs brilliantly in a given activity, esp. a sport.
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A prominent actor or actress, esp. one playing a leading role and having special billing in a given production.
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The future; destiny. Often used with the.
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To mark with an asterisk.
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have stars in (one's) eyes
  • To be dazzled or enraptured, as with romantic love.
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see stars
  • To experience bright, flashing sensations, as from a blow to the head.
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see stars
  • To experience the sensation of lights brightly flashing before the eyes, as from a blow on the head.
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thank one's (lucky) stars
  • To be thankful for what appears to be good luck.
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of star

  • Middle English sterre from Old English steorra ster-3 in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle English sterre, from Old English steorra (“star"), from Proto-Germanic *sternô, *sternÇ­ (“star"), from Proto-Indo-European *hâ‚‚stḗr (“star"). Etymologically related to Esther.
    From Wiktionary