Silica definitions

sĭl'ĭ-kə
A white or colorless crystalline compound, SiO2 , occurring abundantly as quartz, sand, flint, agate, and many other minerals and used to manufacture a wide variety of materials, especially glass and concrete.
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A glassy, very hard mineral, silicon dioxide, SiO2, found in a variety of forms, including quartz, opal, chalcedony, sand, or chert.
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Silica is silicon dioxide which is a hard mineral that looks like glass.

An example of silica is a material found in quartz.

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A chemical compound that is the main constituent of most of the Earth's rocks. Silica occurs naturally in five crystalline forms (quartz, tridymite, cristobalite, coesite, and stishovite), in a cryptocrystalline form (chalcedony), and in an amorphous form (opal). It is also the main chemical compound in sand. Silica is used to make glass, concrete, and other materials. Also called silicon dioxide. Chemical formula: SiO2.
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Silicon dioxide.
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Any of the silica group of the silicate minerals.
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Origin of silica

Origin: 1585-95; in Latin silex (“hard stone, flint"). Subsequently, silicon was first identified by the chemist Antoine Lavoisier in 1787 as a component element of the silex, or silicis for flint, and more generally what were termed "flints" during the era, nowadays as we would say "silica" or more formally, silicate.