Silicon meaning

sĭlĭ-kən, -kŏn
(Si) The base material used in chips. Pronounced "sil-i-kin," not "sil-i-cone," the latter used to make sealants (see silicone), silicon is the most abundant element in nature next to oxygen. It is found in a natural state in rocks and sand, and its atomic structure makes it an ideal semiconductor material. For chip making, silicon is mined from white quartz rocks and put through a chemical process at high temperatures to purify it. Pure silicon is not electrically conductive. In order to make it conductive, it is chemically combined with other materials such as boron and phosphorus (see doping). See silicon germanium and black silicon.
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(chemistry) A nonmetallic element (symbol Si) with an atomic number of 14 and atomic weight of 28.0855.
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(slang) Computing.
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(slang) Computer processor.
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Abbreviation of silicon chip.
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A nonmetallic element occurring extensively in the earth's crust in silica and silicates, having both a brown amorphous and a gray lustrous crystalline allotrope, and used doped or in combination with other materials in glass, semiconducting devices, concrete, brick, refractories, pottery, and silicones. Atomic number 14; atomic weight 28.086; melting point 1,414°C; boiling point 3,265°C; specific gravity 2.33 (25°C); valence 2, 4.
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A nonmetallic chemical element occurring in several forms, found always in combination, and more abundant in nature than any other element except oxygen, with which it combines to form silica: used in the manufacture of transistors, solar cells, rectifiers, silicones, ceramics, etc.: symbol, Si; at. no. 14
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A metalloid element that occurs in both gray crystalline and brown noncrystalline forms. It is the second most abundant element in the Earth's crust and can be found only in silica and silicates. Silicon is used in glass, semiconductors, concrete, and ceramics. Atomic number 14; atomic weight 28.086; melting point 1,410°C; boiling point 2,355°C; specific gravity 2.33; valence 4.
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A brittle nonmetallic element (No. 14 in the Periodic Table of Elements) found in abundance in nature. When combined with oxygen, the only element that is more abundant on Earth, silicon forms silicon dioxide (SiO 2 ), which is used in the manufacture of semiconductors used in transistors, rectifiers, solar cells, glass optical fiber (GOF), etc. Silicon is used in the manufacture of, but is not to be confused with, silicone.
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Origin of silicon

  • From silica

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From the stem of Latin silex (“silica").

    From Wiktionary

  • From the silicon chips used in computers

    From Wiktionary