Senate meaning

sĕnĭt
The supreme council of the ancient Roman state, originally only of patricians but later including the plebeians.
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(literally) A council of elders.
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A lawmaking assembly; state council.
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A governing or advisory council in a college or university.

The Faculty Senate.

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The building or hall where a senate meets.
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Any of several legislative bodies. (In countries which have multiple legislative bodies, the Senate is often the more senior.)
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(historical) The council that governed the ancient Roman Republic.
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(Canada) The Senate of Canada; the upper house of the Canadian parliament; "the Senate".
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(US) The United States Senate, "the Senate".
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(US) The upper legislative body of many of the states of the United States.
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Senate is a group of people who make laws and decisions, the upper house of the U.S. Congress, or the supreme council in ancient Rome.

An example of Senate is an Arizona senator voting on whether or not the minimum wage should be increased.

An example of the Senate is the U.S. Senate.

An example of senate the group of people who gave advice about decisions to the king of Rome.

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An assembly or a council of citizens having the highest deliberative and legislative functions in a government, specifically:
  • The upper house of the US Congress, to which two members are elected from each state by popular vote for a six-year term.
  • The upper house in the bicameral legislature of many states in the United States.
  • The upper legislative house in Canada, France, and some other countries.
  • The supreme council of state of the ancient Roman Republic and later of the Roman Empire.
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The building or hall in which such a council or assembly meets.
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A governing, advisory, or disciplinary body of some colleges and universities composed of faculty members and sometimes student representatives.
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Origin of senate

  • Middle English senat from Old French from Latin senātus from senex sen- old, an elder sen- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition