Secant meaning

sēkănt, -kənt
The reciprocal of the cosine of an angle in a right triangle.
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Cutting; intersecting.
adjective
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Any straight line intersecting a curve at two or more points.
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The reciprocal of the cosine.
  • The ratio of the hypotenuse to the adjacent side of a given acute angle in a right triangle.
  • An equivalent, positive or negative ratio for certain related angles (Ex.: the secant of 57° or 303° is 1.8362, of 123° or 237° is −1.8362) or real numbers representing radians (Ex.: the secant of .9948 radians (57°) is 1.8362).
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A straight line or ray that intersects a curve, especially a circle, at two or more points.
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The ratio of the length of the hypotenuse in a right triangle to the side adjacent to an acute angle. The secant is the inverse of the cosine.
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The reciprocal of the abscissa of the endpoint of an arc of a unit circle centered at the origin of a Cartesian coordinate system, the arc being of length x and measured counterclockwise from the point (1, 0) if x is positive or clockwise if x is negative.
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A function of a number x, equal to the secant of an angle whose measure in radians is equal to x.
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(geometry) A straight line that intersects a curve at two or more points.
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(trigonometry) In a right triangle, the reciprocal of the cosine of an angle. Symbol: sec.
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Origin of secant

  • From Latin secāns secant- present participle of secāre to cut sek- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Latin secans, present participle of secare (“to cut")

    From Wiktionary