Scavenger meaning

skăv'ən-jər
A person who gathers things that have been discarded by others, as a junkman.
noun
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An animal, such as a vulture or housefly, that feeds on dead or decaying matter.
noun
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A substance added to a mixture to remove or inactivate impurities.
noun
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Any animal that eats refuse and decaying organic matter.
noun
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Anything that removes impurities, refuse, etc.
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One that scavenges, as a person who searches through refuse for useful items.
noun
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A person employed to clean the streets, collect refuse, etc.
noun
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An animal, such as a vulture or housefly, that feeds on dead or decaying matter.
noun
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A substance added to a mixture to remove or inactivate impurities.
noun
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An animal that feeds on dead organisms, especially a carnivorous animal that eats dead animals rather than or in addition to hunting live prey. Vultures, hyenas, and wolves are scavengers.
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Someone who scavenges, especially one who searches through rubbish for food or useful things.
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An animal that feeds on decaying matter such as carrion.
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(chemistry) A substance used to remove impurities from the air or from a solution.
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The definition of a scavenger is a person, animal or insect who takes what others have left or thrown away.

An example of a scavenger is a vulture.

An example of a scavenger is someone who takes usable items from dumpsters.

noun
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Origin of scavenger

  • Alteration of Middle English scauager, schavager official charged with street maintenance from Anglo-Norman scawager toll collector from scawage a tax on the goods of foreign merchants from Flemish scauwen to look at, show
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle English scavager, from Old French scawageour (“one who had to do with scavage, inspector, tax collector"), from Old French *scawage, *scavage, escavage, escauwage (“scavage"), alteration of escauvinghe (compare also Medieval Latin scewinga, sceawinga), from Middle English schewing (“inspection, examination"), from Old English scÄ“awung (“reconnoitering, surveying, inspection, examination, scrutiny"), equivalent to showing.
    From Wiktionary