Scarf meaning

skärf
To eat or drink voraciously; devour.
verb
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The definition of a scarf is a piece of cloth worn around the neck or shoulders for decoration, or a joint formed by overlapping two pieces so they appear to be one piece.

An example of a scarf is what a woman may wear around her neck in the winter.

An example of a scarf is a ribbon seamlessly put together from two other pieces of ribbon.

noun
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Scarf is defined as to cover or drape with a piece of fabric, or is slang for greedily eating.

An example of scarf is to drape a table cloth.

An example of scarf is to devour two burgers, a large order of fries and a chocolate shake in minutes.

verb
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A long piece of cloth worn about the head, neck, or shoulders.
noun
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A decorative cloth for covering the top of a piece of furniture; a runner.
noun
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A sash indicating military rank.
noun
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To dress, cover, or decorate with or as if with a scarf.
verb
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To wrap (an outer garment) around one like a scarf.
verb
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A joint made by cutting or notching the ends of two pieces correspondingly and strapping or bolting them together.
noun
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Either of the correspondingly cut or notched ends that fit together to form such a joint.
noun
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To join by means of a scarf.
verb
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A long or broad piece of cloth worn about the neck, head, or shoulders for warmth or decoration; muffler, babushka, neckerchief, etc.
noun
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A long, narrow covering for a table, bureau top, etc.; runner.
noun
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A sash worn by soldiers or officials.
noun
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To cut a scarf in.
verb
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To cover or drape with a scarf.
verb
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A joint made by notching, grooving, or otherwise cutting the ends of two pieces and fastening them so that they lap over and join firmly into one continuous piece.
noun
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The end of a piece cut in this fashion.
noun
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To join by a scarf.
verb
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To cut so as to form a scarf on.
verb
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To consume greedily.
verb
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A long, often knitted, garment worn around the neck.
noun
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noun
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(dated) A neckcloth or cravat.
noun
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To throw on loosely; to put on like a scarf.
verb
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To dress with a scarf, or as with a scarf; to cover with a loose wrapping.
verb
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A type of joint in woodworking.
noun
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A groove on one side of a sewing machine needle.
noun
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A dip or notch or cut made in the trunk of a tree to direct its fall when felling.
noun
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To shape by grinding.
verb
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To form a scarf on the end or edge of, as for a joint in timber, forming a "V" groove for welding adjacent metal plates, metal rods, etc.
verb
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To unite, as two pieces of timber or metal, by a scarf joint.
verb
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(US, slang) To eat very quickly.

You sure scarfed that pizza.

verb
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(Scotland) A cormorant.
noun
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Origin of scarf

  • French dialectal escarpe sash, sling from Old North French variant of Old French escherpe pilgrim's bag hung from the neck from Frankish skirpja small rush from Latin scirpus rush

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English skarf (as in scarfnail nail for fastening a scarf joint) probably from Old Norse skarfr end piece of a board cut off on the bias

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Variant of scoff

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Probably from Old Northern French escarpe (cf. Old French escherpe (“pilgrim's purse suspended from the neck")), possibly from Frankish *skirpja or of other Germanic origin (cf. Old Norse skreppa (“small bag, wallet, satchel")). Alternatively from Medieval Latin scirpa (“little woven bag of rushes"), from Latin scirpus (“rush, bullrush"). . The verb is derived from the noun.

    From Wiktionary

  • Of imitative origin, or a variant of scoff. Alternatively from Old English sceorfan (“gnaw, bite").

    From Wiktionary

  • Of uncertain origin. Possibly from Old Norse skarfr, derivative of skera (“to cut").

    From Wiktionary

  • Icelandic skarfr?

    From Wiktionary