Raven meaning

rā'vən
To consume greedily; devour.
verb
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Black and lustrous.
adjective
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To devour greedily.
verb
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To seize forcibly.
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To prowl hungrily; search for prey or plunder.
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To devour food or prey greedily.
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To have a voracious appetite.
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noun
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A common name for several, generally large and lustrous black species of birds in the genus Corvus, especially the common raven, Corvus corax.
noun
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Of the color of the raven; jet-black.

Raven curls.

Raven darkness.

She was a tall, sophisticated, raven-haired beauty.

adjective
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noun
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Prey; plunder; food obtained by violence.
noun
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(archaic) To obtain or seize by violence.
verb
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To devour with great eagerness.
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To prey with rapacity; to be greedy; to show rapacity.

The raven is both a scavenger, who ravens a dead animal almost like a vulture, and a bird of prey, who commonly ravens to catch a rodent.

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A female given name for a girl with raven hair, used since the 1970s.
pronoun
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The definition of raven is something that is shiny and black.

An example of something raven is black hair.

adjective
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Raven is defined as a large black bird with a straight and sharp beak.

A large crow is an example of a raven.

noun
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A large bird (Corvus corax) of the Northern Hemisphere, having black plumage and a croaking cry.
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Any of several similar birds of the genus Corvus, found in Africa, Australia, and southwestern North America.
noun
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Black and shiny.

Raven tresses.

adjective
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To seek or seize as prey or plunder.
verb
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To seek or seize prey or plunder.
verb
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To eat ravenously.
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Any of various large crows; esp., the largest crow (Corvus corax), with a straight, sharp beak, found in Europe, Asia, and North America.
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Origin of raven

  • From Middle English ravin, raven rapine, plunder, prey ravin
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Middle English from Old English hræfn
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Old English hræfn, from Proto-Germanic *hrabnaz (compare Dutch raaf, German Rabe, Danish ravn), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱorhâ‚‚- (compare Middle Irish crú, Latin corvus, Lithuanian šárka (“magpie"), Serbo-Croatian svrȁka "˜id.', Ancient Greek κόραξ (kórax)), from *ḱer, *ḱor (compare Latin crepare "˜to creak, crack', Sanskrit kṛ́patÄ“).
    From Wiktionary
  • From Old French raviner (“rush, seize by force"), itself from ravine (“rapine"), from Latin rapina (“plundering, loot"), itself from rapere (“seize, plunder, abduct")
    From Wiktionary