Puritan definition

pyo͝orĭ-tn
Characteristic of a puritan; puritanical.
adjective
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A person regarded as excessively strict in morals and religion.
noun
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A person who is very strict or austere in religious practice or moral outlook, especially someone who regards pleasure or luxury as sinful.
noun
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A member of a group of English Protestants who in the 1500s and 1600s advocated strict religious discipline along with simplification of the ceremonies and creeds of the Church of England.
noun
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Of or relating to the Puritans or Puritanism.
adjective
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Of the Puritans or Puritanism.
adjective
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(often disapproving): a puritanical person.
noun
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(often disapproving): acting or behaving according to the Puritan morals (e.g. propagating modesty), especially with regard to pleasure, nudity and sex.
adjective
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A member of a particular Protestant religious sect.
noun
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Any member of a Protestant group in England and the American colonies that in the 16th and 17th cent. wanted to make the Church of England simpler in its services and stricter about morals.
noun
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adjective
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
puritan
Plural:
puritans

Origin of puritan

  • From Late Latin pūritās purity (on the model of Medieval Latin Kathari “the Pure Ones,” a third-century sect of rigorist heretics) from Latin pūrus pure peuə- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition