Pica meaning

pīkə
Frequency:
An abnormal craving or appetite for nonfood substances, such as dirt, paint, or clay.
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A size of type, 12 point.
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(typography, uncountable) A size of type.
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(typography, countable) A unit of measure equivalent to 12 points.
  • The traditional British and American pica, about 4.22 mm, or 0.166 in (close to 1/6 of an inch).
  • The PostScript pica, 1/6 of an inch.
noun
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A type size for typewriters, providing ten characters to the inch.
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The height of this type, about16 inch.
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A size of type for typewriters, measuring 10 characters to the linear inch.
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An abnormal craving to eat substances not fit for food, as clay or paint.
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A psychiatric disorder characterized by the compulsive eating of nonfood substances, such as soil, clay, ice, or hair.
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(1) In word processing, a monospaced font that prints 10 characters per inch.
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(medicine) A disorder characterized by craving and appetite for non-edible substances, such as ice, clay, chalk, dirt, or sand.
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A taxonomic genus within the family Corvidae "” the magpies.
pronoun
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Archaic form of pika. (small rodent)
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Origin of pica

  • Probably from Medieval Latin pīca list of church services (perhaps from the typeface used to print it)

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • New Latin pīca from Latin magpie (from its omnivorous nature)

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • The printing senses are probably from named the obsolete service book, which used this type size (compare canon and brevier) . In turn seemingly from Latin pÄ«ca (“magpie"), after the piebald appearance of the typeset page (compare pie (“disordered type")).

    From Wiktionary

  • From Latin pÄ«ca (“magpie, jay") (from the idea that magpies will eat almost anything).

    From Wiktionary

  • From Latin pica (“magpie").

    From Wiktionary