Photosynthesis definition

fōtō-sĭnthĭ-sĭs
The process in green plants and certain other organisms by which carbohydrates are synthesized from carbon dioxide and a source of hydrogen (usually water), using light as an energy source. Most forms of photosynthesis release oxygen as a byproduct.
noun
94
26
The biological synthesis of chemical compounds in the presence of light.
noun
67
23
The process by which green plants, algae, diatoms, and certain forms of bacteria make carbohydrates from carbon dioxide and water in the presence of chlorophyll, using energy captured from sunlight by chlorophyll, and releasing excess oxygen as a byproduct. In plants and algae, photosynthesis takes place in organelles called chloroplasts . Photosynthesis is usually viewed as a two-step process. First, in the light reactions , the energy-providing molecule ATP is synthesized using light energy absorbed by chlorophyll and accessory pigments such as carotenoids and phycobilins, and water is broken apart into oxygen and a hydrogen ion, with the electron of the hydrogen transferred to another energy molecule, NADPH. The ATP and NADPH molecules power the second part of photosynthesis by the transfer of electrons. In these light-independent or dark reactions , carbon is broken away from carbon dioxide and combined with hydrogen via the Calvin cycle to create carbohydrates. Some of the carbohydrates, the sugars, can then be transported around the organism for immediate use; others, the starches, can be stored for later use.
54
22
The production of organic substances, chiefly sugars, from carbon dioxide and water occurring in green plant cells supplied with enough light to allow chlorophyll to aid in the transformation of the radiant energy into a chemical form.
noun
48
17
The process in green plants and certain other organisms by which carbohydrates are synthesized from carbon dioxide and a source of hydrogen (usually water), using light as an energy source. Most forms of photosynthesis release oxygen as a byproduct.
noun
48
18
Advertisement
Photosynthesis uses sunlight, carbon dioxide and water to produce oxygen, glucose and water.
noun
28
9
The definition of photosynthesis is the process through which plants use water and carbon dioxide to create their food, grow and release excess oxygen into the air.
noun
14
8
Photosynthesis is not limited to green plants, it is also a process that occurs in certain algae, specifically blue-green algae and bacteria.

An example of photosynthesis is how plants convert sugar and energy from water, air and sunlight into energy to grow.

noun
13
8
(biology) The process by which plants and other photoautotrophs generate carbohydrates and oxygen from carbon dioxide, water, and light energy.
noun
12
7
The roots of the plant provide the water that is required for the process to proceed and the chlorophyll in the cells of the leaf absorbs the necessary sunlight.
noun
8
5
Advertisement
The structure of the leaf allows for carbon dioxide and oxygen to enter and leave the leaf, which is where photosynthesis actually takes place.
noun
6
4
The water given off cools a plant on a hot, sunny day, similar to the way human beings cool off when perspiring. A mature house plant can transpire its body weight daily.
noun
5
3
The water from the leaves evaporates through the stomata, and filling its place, entering the stomata from the air, is carbon dioxide. Plants need carbon dioxide to make food.
noun
6
5

Origin of photosynthesis