Oxygen meaning

ŏksĭ-jən
Oxygen is a colorless and odorless gas that people need to breath.

An example of oxygen is the colorless and odorless gas that you breath in every day.

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A chemical element (symbol O) with an atomic number of 8 and relative atomic mass of 15.9994.
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A nonmetallic element that exists in its free form as a colorless, odorless gas and makes up about 21 percent of the Earth's atmosphere. It is the most abundant element in the Earth's crust and occurs in many compounds, including water, carbon dioxide, and iron ore. Oxygen combines with most elements, is required for combustion, and is essential for life in most organisms. Atomic number 8; atomic weight 15.9994; melting point −218.8°C; boiling point −182.9°C; gas density at 0°C 1.429 grams per liter; valence 2.
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A colorless, odorless, tasteless, gaseous chemical element that occurs free in the atmosphere, forming one fifth of its volume, and in combination in water, sandstone, limestone, etc.: it is very active, combines with nearly all other elements, is the most common element in the earth's crust, and is essential to life processes and to combustion: symbol, O; at. no. 8
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(countable) An atom of this element.
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Molecular oxygen (O2), a colorless, odorless gas at room temperature.
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A nonmetallic element constituting 21 percent of the atmosphere by volume that occurs as a diatomic gas, O2 , and in many compounds such as water and silica, and in iron ore. It combines with most elements, is essential for plant and animal respiration, and is required for nearly all combustion. Ozone, O3 , is an allotrope of this element. Atomic number 8; atomic weight 15.9994; melting point −218.79°C; boiling point −182.9°C; gas density at 0°C 1.429 grams per liter; valence 2.
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(medicine) A mixture of oxygen and other gases, administered to a patient to help him or her to breathe.
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Origin of oxygen

  • French oxygène Greek oxus sharp, acid ak- in Indo-European roots French -gène -gen

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Borrowed from French oxygène (originally in the form principe oxygène, a variant of principe oxigine "˜acidifying principle', suggested by Lavoisier), from Ancient Greek ὀξύς (oxus, “sharp") + γένος (genos, “birth"), referring to oxygen's role in the formation of acids.

    From Wiktionary