Pew meaning

pyo͝o
One of the long, fixed, backed benches that are arranged in rows for the seating of a congregation in church.
noun
2
0
Any of the benches with a back that are fixed in rows in a church.
noun
0
0
Any of the boxlike enclosures with seats, in some churches, for the use as of a particular family.
noun
0
0
One of the long benches in a church, seating several persons, usually fixed to the floor and facing the chancel.

In many churches some pews are reserved for either clerical or liturgical officials such as canons, or for prominent families.

noun
0
0
An enclosed compartment in a church which provides seating for a group of people, often a prominent family.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
Any structure shaped like a church pew, such as a stall, formerly used by money lenders, etc.; a box in a theatre; or a pen or sheepfold.

noun
0
0
To furnish with pews.

verb
0
0
An expression of disgust in response to an unpleasant odor.
interjection
0
0
Representative of the sound made by the firing of a machine gun.
interjection
0
0
pronoun
0
0
Advertisement
An enclosed compartment in a church that provides seating for a number of people, such as a family.
noun
0
1

Origin of pew

  • Middle English pewe probably from Old French puie balcony from Latin podia pl. of podium balcony podium
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle English pewe, from Middle French puie (“balustrade"), from Latin podia, plural of podium (“parapet, podium"), from Ancient Greek πόδιον (podion, “little foot"), from πούς (pous, “foot").
    From Wiktionary
  • Possibly from French putois (“skunk") or puer (“to stink") or a truncation of putrid.
    From Wiktionary
  • Less common spelling of Pugh, from Welsh ap + Huw.
    From Wiktionary
  • Onomatopoetic.
    From Wiktionary