Oracle meaning

ôr'ə-kəl, ŏr'-
The definition of an oracle is a person with great wisdom or someone believed to have communication with a deity.

An example of an oracle is someone who has conversations with God.

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One who communicates a divine command; an angel; a prophet.
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(obsolete) To utter oracles or prophecies.
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(computing theory) A theoretical entity capable of answering some collection of questions.
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A person such as a priest through whom the deity is supposed to respond with prophecy or advice.
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A person considered to be a source of wisdom.

A literary oracle.

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(Jewish antiquity) The sanctuary, or most holy place in the temple; also, the temple itself.

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Among the ancient Greeks and Romans,
  • The place where, or medium by which, deities were consulted.
  • The revelation or response of a medium or priest.
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A command or revelation from God.
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In the Bible, the sanctuary of the Temple.
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The holy of holies of the ancient Jewish Temple: 1 Kings 6:16, 19-23
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A prophetic response, often enigmatic or allegorical, so given.
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A wise sentence or decision of great authority.
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Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster's Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
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(Oracle Corporation, Redwood Shores, CA, www.oracle.com) The world's largest database and enterprise software vendor founded in 1977 by Larry Ellison. The Oracle Database has been Oracle's flagship product, which was the first DBMS to incorporate the SQL query language. It became very popular due to its robustness and huge variety of platforms that it ran on.In the mid-1990s, Oracle was a major promoter of the network computer, forming subsidiary Network Computer, Inc. to define the specifications for the platform. Although the network computer did not take off, the principles it embodied are widely used in today's thin client architectures and are ever increasing. See network computer and Liberate.After the turn of the century, the company greatly enhanced its application offerings by acquiring world class software companies such as PeopleSoft in 2004 and Siebel Systems in 2005. In 2010, Oracle acquired Sun Microsystems to become a full-fledged computer systems company as well as master of Java, one of the Internet's most widely used software platforms. See Oracle Database, Oracle Fusion, Sun, Java, PeopleSoft and Siebel software.
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Origin of oracle

  • Middle English from Old French from Latin ōrāculum from ōrāre to speak
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Old French oracle.
    From Wiktionary